10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites

The design of mobile sites is the new wave of IxD. It seems everyone has an article these days about it. UX Matters is no different and posted this up today.

10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites :: UXmatters.

Immersive Mobile Drop Down Menus

An interesting article on UX Magazine by Greg Nudelman about prioritizing screen space for search results and using drop down menus instead of taking up 22-30% of the screen for menus and tabs.

Wells Fargo’s redesigned site is a great example.

I just wonder how well it will work. It is a classic case of how designers need to push the limits of what mobile can do, while keeping the consumer’s tendency coined by Marshall McLuhan, “to walk backwards into the future”. We want to utilize all the best attributes of mobile computing and provide the best experience for the device, but innovative thinking can often confuse users if it strays too far from the status quo.

Top 10 Best Designed Websites 2010

While I may not agree with Ben Hunt, author of Save the Pixel about the site choices (there are LOTS of great sites out there), I do think the points he makes about each of the sites are right on target and helpful in thinking about whatever design work we may do in the future.

The keys to being on Ben’s list appears to be very content/subject focused. No fancy interactions (there is only one Flash site on the whole list). Continue reading

UseIt Definition of Mental Models

A definition of Mental Models from Jakob Nielsen:

A mental model is what the user believes about the system at hand.

Note the two important elements of this definition:

  • A mental model is based on belief, not facts: that is, it’s a model of what users know (or think they know) about a system such as your website. Hopefully, users’ thinking is closely related to reality because they base their predictions about the system on their mental models and thus plan their future actions based on how that model predicts the appropriate course. It’s a prime goal for designers to make the user interface communicate the system’s basic nature well enough that users form reasonably accurate (and thus useful) mental models.
  • Individual users each have their own mental model. A mental model is internal to each user’s brain, and different users might construct different mental models of the same user interface. Further, one of usability’s big dilemmas is the common gap between designers’ and users’ mental models. Because designers know too much, they form wonderful mental models of their own creations, leading them to believe that each feature is easy to understand. Users’ mental models of the UI are likely to be somewhat more deficient, making them more likely to make mistakes and find the design much more difficult to use.

No matter what you think, your users have a different idea what the site does than you do.

And…

Remember Jakob’s Law of the Internet User Experience: Users spend most of their time on websites other than yours. Thus a big part of customers’ mental models of your site will be influenced by information gleaned from other sites.