10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites

The design of mobile sites is the new wave of IxD. It seems everyone has an article these days about it. UX Matters is no different and posted this up today.

10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites :: UXmatters.

Immersive Mobile Drop Down Menus

An interesting article on UX Magazine by Greg Nudelman about prioritizing screen space for search results and using drop down menus instead of taking up 22-30% of the screen for menus and tabs.

Wells Fargo’s redesigned site is a great example.

I just wonder how well it will work. It is a classic case of how designers need to push the limits of what mobile can do, while keeping the consumer’s tendency coined by Marshall McLuhan, “to walk backwards into the future”. We want to utilize all the best attributes of mobile computing and provide the best experience for the device, but innovative thinking can often confuse users if it strays too far from the status quo.

2010 Internet Statistics

What happened with the Internet in 2010?

How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many Internet users were there? This post will answer all of those questions and many, many more. If it’s stats you want, you’ve got it.

Royal Pingdom used a wide variety of sources from around the Web to put this post together. You can find the full list of source references at the bottom of the post if you’re interested. They  also did some additional calculations to get you even more numbers to chew on.

Prepare for a good kind of information overload.

Email

  • 107 trillion – The number of emails sent on the Internet in 2010.
  • 294 billion – Average number of email messages per day.
  • 1.88 billion – The number of email users worldwide.
  • 480 million – New email users since the year before.
  • 89.1% – The share of emails that were spam.
  • 262 billion – The number of spam emails per day (assuming 89% are spam).
  • 2.9 billion – The number of email accounts worldwide.
  • 25% – Share of email accounts that are corporate.

Websites

  • 255 million – The number of websites as of December 2010.
  • 21.4 million – Added websites in 2010. Continue reading

Working Within Mobile UI Design Limitations

Providing alternative views of how best to design for mobile. I am researching in printed text and online. The best and the brightest up and coming international talents have started their careers with mobile already being their focus.

Article posted by Sacha Grief

Overcoming Limited Navigation Space

Navigation is especially important for mobile interfaces because of the limited space and constrained interactions. People cannot open your app in multiple tabs, use keyboard shortcuts, or create macros, so it’s vital that every part of your app be easy to access.

Sketches (shown here for LePost iPhone app) let you quickly iterate through different ideas.

For Le Monde’s newspaper app, navigation was one of the biggest concerns. How do you keep a newspaper’s linear structure, yet provide fast access to any single page or article? And how do you take advantage of a newspaper’s beautiful layout, while still offering maximum readability on a smaller physical surface?

Tools like Omnigraffle can help you plan the app’s overall architecture.

Continue reading

UseIt Definition of Mental Models

A definition of Mental Models from Jakob Nielsen:

A mental model is what the user believes about the system at hand.

Note the two important elements of this definition:

  • A mental model is based on belief, not facts: that is, it’s a model of what users know (or think they know) about a system such as your website. Hopefully, users’ thinking is closely related to reality because they base their predictions about the system on their mental models and thus plan their future actions based on how that model predicts the appropriate course. It’s a prime goal for designers to make the user interface communicate the system’s basic nature well enough that users form reasonably accurate (and thus useful) mental models.
  • Individual users each have their own mental model. A mental model is internal to each user’s brain, and different users might construct different mental models of the same user interface. Further, one of usability’s big dilemmas is the common gap between designers’ and users’ mental models. Because designers know too much, they form wonderful mental models of their own creations, leading them to believe that each feature is easy to understand. Users’ mental models of the UI are likely to be somewhat more deficient, making them more likely to make mistakes and find the design much more difficult to use.

No matter what you think, your users have a different idea what the site does than you do.

And…

Remember Jakob’s Law of the Internet User Experience: Users spend most of their time on websites other than yours. Thus a big part of customers’ mental models of your site will be influenced by information gleaned from other sites.