Man Replaces Eye with Camera

I like the name “Eyeborg”.

Rob Spence is a documentary film maker who lost his eye due to a childhood accident. He has worked with scientists and engineers to make a new eye that sends a wireless signal that can then be recorded.

There are many other scientists, doctors and futurists working on robotic prosthetics and the future of cyborg reality is not far away. See the video after the break for an interview. Continue reading

How TED Connects the Idea-Hungry Elite

I have published multiple videos and discussions spawned by the TED conference that happens every year in Long Beach, CA

I find the talks inspiring and the fact that the videos are available to the general public and spawn additional ideas and responses is what makes TED so influential.

An article from FastCompany Online makes mention of several of the best features of TED.

Additionally, they point out some of their favorite videos. I must say that Patti Maes and Pranav Mistry’s Sixth Sense talks still; capture my imagination of the future of personal computing. Barry Schwartz’s Paradox of Choice is also very compelling.

1) Jill Bolte Taylor
My Stroke of Insight

2008
When the neuroscientist picks up a human brain with a spinal cord attached, the audience gasps. When she’s done talking about her stroke, they’re crying.
6) Dan Pink
Surprising Science of Motivation

2009
The science proves that intrinsic motivation works better than extrinsic rewards, but your boss doesn’t understand. Pink explains how to tell her.
2) Patti Maes and Pranav Mistry
Sixth Sense Demo

2009
The MIT Media Lab researchers debut a spooky Minority Report — style wearable interface.
7) Hans Rosling
The Best Stats You’ve Ever Seen

2006
The Swedish professor dances through a spectacular animation of world development.
3) Ken Robinson
Schools Kill Creativity

2006
This highly influential talk spawned a viral 2010 follow-up and made the creativity expert a star; Robinson says he now “gets stopped in airports.”
8) Benjamin Zander
On Music and Passion

2008
TED hosts performances as well as talks. This blends the two, with Zander at the grand piano.
4) Tony Robbins
Why We Do What We Do

2006
Robbins high-fives Al Gore in this video. “One of the best TED moments of all time,” says TED video chief June Cohen.
9) Barry Schwartz
The Paradox of Choice

2006
In a baggy T-shirt, with glasses sliding down his nose, Schwartz gives a profound, witty discourse on why more freedom doesn’t equal more happiness.
5) Elizabeth Gilbert
Nurturing Creativity

2009
The best-selling author bares her struggle to repeat the success of Eat, Pray, Love.
10) V.S. Ramachandran
On Your Mind

2007
A brain scientist in a leather jacket tell us how “this 3-pound mass of jelly … can contemplate the meaning of infinity.”

I would also recommend taking a look at several of the best performance videos on TED. (click on TED and select talks re-sized to ‘beautiful’ and related to ‘entertainment’)

Give Yourself a 6th Sense for $350

Several years ago, I found TED and started watching amazing 18 minute videos of people changing the world.

One of the most amazing videos I saw

(and posted) was of Pattie Maes of MIT’s Media Labs showing what her graduate student, Pranav Mistry, had created; a 6th Sense hardware that was cobbled together from existing technology, along with a software program that allowed you to have a mobile virtual multi-touch gestural interface that was a predecessor of the augmented reality applications we have seen developing for the smartphones over the last few years. Continue reading

Qi Zhang Plays Electric Organ at TED

Organ virtuoso Qi Zhang plays her electric rendering of “Ridiculous Fellows” from Prokofiev’s “The Love for Three Oranges” orchestral suite. This exhilarating performance from TEDx USC features the Yamaha Electone Stagea, a rare, imported instrument specially programmed by Qi herself.

About Qi Zhang

Qi Zhang is a Master’s candidate at University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music, and an award-winning international organist. Full bio and more links

My Favorite Presentation from TED.

Sixth Sense Seamless Technology

Ted continues to be cutting edge and exciting.

The idea of having pertinent, semantically appropriate information literally at your fingertips in the moments you need it to make a decision about your next action is what we really want. This technology could make it happen. Its called Sixth Sense and is being developed by Fluid Interfaces (formally Ambient Intelligence) at the MIT Media Lab.

Touch and gestural interfaces are great, but this takes your Microsoft table idea and makes it mobile. It can be anywhere, including on the surface of the people, places and products you are interacting with. The usability of this technology looks like it could be completely intuitive and easy, which is what will make it adoptable by the general public.

The video of Dr. Pattie Maes presenting at TED is the best way to understand what they are working on and how it will apply to your daily life.