August browser stats: Safari dominates mobile browsing

The browser stats posts ARS normally make have been rather complicated this month by a radical change from the company that provides the data they use (Net Market Share).

The new data reveals Safari\’s dominance of mobile browsing and Android\’s surprisingly poor performance in that same market.

via August browser stats: Safari dominates mobile browsing.

Here are some of hte Infographics from the site.

Mobile Browsers August 2011

2010 Internet Statistics

What happened with the Internet in 2010?

How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many Internet users were there? This post will answer all of those questions and many, many more. If it’s stats you want, you’ve got it.

Royal Pingdom used a wide variety of sources from around the Web to put this post together. You can find the full list of source references at the bottom of the post if you’re interested. They  also did some additional calculations to get you even more numbers to chew on.

Prepare for a good kind of information overload.

Email

  • 107 trillion – The number of emails sent on the Internet in 2010.
  • 294 billion – Average number of email messages per day.
  • 1.88 billion – The number of email users worldwide.
  • 480 million – New email users since the year before.
  • 89.1% – The share of emails that were spam.
  • 262 billion – The number of spam emails per day (assuming 89% are spam).
  • 2.9 billion – The number of email accounts worldwide.
  • 25% – Share of email accounts that are corporate.

Websites

  • 255 million – The number of websites as of December 2010.
  • 21.4 million – Added websites in 2010. Continue reading

Social Statistics Overstate Findings

This latest ESP study from Cornell brings into focus an issue that we statisticians and behavioral analysts have been aware of for years; considering a finding “statistically significant” if there is less than 5% probability that the finding could have been found by chance does not take into account ALL the findings that could have happened by chance. Therefore, we get lots of results that are found later to be, at best, inaccurate, but more often, totally false (I’m looking at you, Wakefield!).

Continue reading