Facebook Users Hit by Virus

facebook virus

I saw this article posted by a friend on Facebook (of course). The original article was written by By Dan Whitworth, and is available on the BBC News site.

Facebook’s 120 million users are being targeted by a virus designed to get hold of sensitive information like credit card details.

‘Koobface’ spreads by sending a message to people’s inboxes, pretending to be from a Facebook friend. It says “you look funny in this new video” or “you look just awesome in this new video”. By clicking on the link provided they’re then asked to watch a “secret video by Tom”.

When users try and play the video they’re asked to download the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. If they do, that’s when the virus takes hold and attacks the computer.

Guy Bunker works for Symantec, who make Norton AntiVirus, and says there are two ways Koobface gets people’s credit card details.

“It can either wait for you to buy something online and just remember the details you type in on your keyboard.

“Otherwise it can search your computer for any cookies you might have from when you’ve bought something in the past, and take them from there.”

Networking threat

The Facebook case is the latest example of hackers using social networking sites to try to cash in.

MySpace was targeted by Koobface in August.

Security experts say people are far less suspicious about viruses on sites like Facebook because you need to be a member to log in.

Facebook won’t give any specifics on how many users have been hit by the virus, only saying it’s a small percentage.

But they have posted some advice on the site about what to do if you come across it.

“We’re currently helping our users with the recently discovered ‘Koobface’ worm and phishing sites.

“If your account has recently been used to send spam, please visit one of the online antivirus scanners from the Helpful Links list, and reset your password.”

I found a similar article HERE that describes the details of the virus and encourages you to get good antivirus software to help avoid these problems.

A New Age: Internet Presidency

Barack Obama

The 2008 presidential election marked two great changes to the U.S. Presidency. TheĀ  most obvious, of course, was the election of an African-American as the next president of the United States.

But the bigger change over the long term was the crowning of the Internet as the king of all political media. It was the end of the era of television presidency that started with JFK, and the beginning of the Internet presidency.

“Barack Obama built the biggest network of supporters we’ve seen, using the Internet to do it,” Joe Trippi, an Internet political and business consultant who pioneered the use of the Internet in politics managing Howard Dean campaign in 2004, and who managed John Edwards’ campaign in this election, told InformationWeek. “I don’t think there’s any doubt that communication through YouTube and other social networks put him over the top.”

Obama used a combination of television, the Internet, and social media to recruit volunteers and supporters, and cement relationships with them. He asked supporters to supply their cell phone numbers, and sent out regular text-message blasts, even announcing his selection for vice president over text message. Using a custom social networking site, created with the help of a Facebook co-founder, Obama supporters were able to log in and find lists of people they could call, or whose doors they could knock on, to try to persuade others to vote for their candidate.

And it’s only the beginning, said Trippi. That kind of networking will likely transform the White House. Trippi anticipates Obama will create a similar social networking for his legislative initiatives and recruit supporters to lobby Congress to get his policies enacted into law.

The result will be further increase of presidential power and the erosion of congressional authority. “Congress will be put between a rock and a hard place, if millions of citizens sign up to help the president pass his agenda,” Trippi said. “If the president says, ‘Here are the members of Congress who stand in the way of us passing health care reform,’ I would not want to be one of those people. You’ll have 10 or 15 million networked Americans barging in on the members of Congress telling them to get in line with the program and pass the health care reform bill. That will be a power that no American president has had before. Congress’ power will be taken over by the American people.”

The Obama administration is expected to build on a foundation of grassroots support in his private social network, on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. YouTube users alone spent 14.5 million hours watching official Barack Obama campaign videos — and that isn’t even including user-generated videos, Trippi said, adding that amount of network time for political commercials would have cost $46 million — and, while YouTube users requested the videos and therefore most likely watched them, there’s no way to tell whether anybody’s watching TV commercials.

The Obama campaign used Google (NSDQ: GOOG) Maps mashups to help volunteers find local campaign resources and people to contact and try to persuade. And, of course, it used the Internet to solicit donations. Some 3.2 million people donated to the Obama campaign through its Web site.

Obama’s Facebook page has 2.6 million supporters. Obama’s official Facebook application has 161,000 active users, who used the application to share news items, blog posts, speeches, and videos.

The BarackObama Twitter account has about 123,000 followers, making it the most popular account on Twitter, according to the Twitter tracking site Twitterholic.

By comparison, John McCain’s Facebook page had 624,000 supporters.

The statistics mashup tool Trendrr.com reported that Obama was mentioned in nearly 500 million blog posts since the conventions at the end of August. During the same period, only about 150 million posts mentioned McCain. On social networks, Obama led, with 844,927 MySpace friends compared with McCain’s 219,404, according to the Web 2.0 blog ReadWriteWeb.

Joe Baker is one Obama volunteer who used the Internet to help work for his candidate. He worked in an Obama campaign office in Chico, Calif., making phone calls to persuade voters, staffing the front desk, taking donations, and greeting people and taking donations. Baker is a disabled, retired Army officer.

He praised the Neighbor to Neighbor application on the Obama Web site as a means of getting out the vote. Obama supporters in swing states could log on to the Obama Web site and get a phone list of people in their neighborhoods to call and encourage them to vote for Obama. Baker and his colleagues in Chico used the site to coordinate with Democrats in Reno, Nev., to persuade Nevada voters to support Obama.

“MyBarackObama was very much a key place,” Baker said. “The tenet of the campaign was to always send people directly to what Obama had said.” The campaign made that easy by making Obama’s position papers, statements, and videos readily available. “They didn’t necessarily want us to tell people our opinions, they wanted it to be representative of what Obama thought.”

Baker, whose injuries sustained in Vietnam and subsequent military service make it difficult for him to stand or walk for long periods, is active in Second Life, using the name “Willys Faulkes.” He built an Obama campaign headquarters in the virtual world, where supporters could download campaign literature and get in discussions with other Obama supporters, undecided voters, and McCain supporters as well — the Republican campaign also had supporters in Second Life.

Obama’s Internet candidacy should be a lesson for business as well, said Trippi, who does both political and business consulting on the use of the Internet. “You have to change your whole way of thinking,” he said. “You’re going to lose control of your brand to a large degree, unless you create networks to change your brand.”

Historically, businesses have sought to be big and controlling Goliaths, and the Internet and social networks are becoming armies of Davids. “You don’t want to be Goliath anymore, you want to be the guys handing out the slingshots,” Trippi said.

For example: The traditional recording industry is a Goliath, trying to force people to continue to buy whole albums and CDs to get one good song. The army of Davids consists of consumers downloading music.

Apple is the company selling slingshots, in the form of iPods and iTunes.

this article taken in part from InformationWeek.

Microsoft Makes Key Hire in Researcher Danah Boyd

The importance and influence of social media and interfaces (MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc) cannot be overstated. The big corporations are finally acknowledging their need to be a part of the WikiWeb that is constantly evolving and is a source for marketing that cannot be ignored. danah boyd has been at the forefront or research in this field and has been swept up by Microsoft.

Original article written by Marshall Kirkpatrick and available to read HERE

danah boyd cartoon

Microsoft Research has hired social network researcher danah boyd, probably the most high profile academic in the world focused on the emerging web and its social consequences.

Who is danah boyd? (She spells her own name with lower case letters.) You may have seen her when she hit the international spotlight for writing about the shift from MySpace to Facebook. She wrote that her research leads her to conclude that “The goodie two shoes, jocks, athletes, or other ‘good’ kids are now going to Facebook. …MySpace is still home for Latino/Hispanic teens, immigrant teens, ‘burnouts,’ ‘alternative kids,’ ‘art fags,’ punks, emos, goths, gangstas, queer kids, and other kids who didn’t play into the dominant high school popularity paradigm.”

That paper was very controversial and widely misunderstood. It also argued what many people may were thinking quietly, though often not within a context sympathetic with underprivileged youth.

None the less, that was only one of boyd’s many writings on the subject of youth and social networking. Youth and social networking is a nexus point for one of the most significant cultural changes of our era and as the leading expert on the topic, boyd’s work warrants the attention it gets. If Microsoft is going to be relevant to the next generation of computer users, who better to pay attention to than the leading expert on how the next generation is using social networks?

Boyd’s new position will be at Microsoft Research’s newest facility, in Boston, which was just opened this summer. You can read boyd’s discussion of her new position in a blog post she wrote last night.
What Boyd Writes About

In addition to topics like socio-economic class and social networks, boyd also writes, for example, about early social networks like Friendster acting as “tools for scaling up social networks rooted in proximate social relations and–equally significantly–for representing this dynamic to the community in new ways.”

Her recent work in general might best be described with these lines from Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life:

While particular systems may come and go, how youth engage through social network sites today provides long-lasting insights into identity formation, status negotiation, and peer-to-peer sociality…I argue that social network sites are a type of networked public with four properties that are not typically present in face-to-face public life: persistence, searchability, exact copyability, and invisible audiences. These properties fundamentally alter social dynamics, complicating the ways in which people interact. I conclude by reflecting on the social developments that have prompted youth to seek out networked publics, and considering the changing role that publics have in young people’s lives.

Boyd’s Fascinating Gigs

Boyd is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Information at the University of California-Berkeley and a Fellow at the Harvard University Law School Berkman Center for Internet and Society. She’s also on the Board of Advisors of LiveJournal, along with Lawrence Lessig and Esther Dyson.

Previously boyd worked as a researcher at Yahoo! and did a year long internship at Google studying the ethnography of blogging at Blogger.

Now she’ll join Microsoft Research New England in January. She says she’ll be directing her own research, publishing frequently and doing pure, interdisciplinary science instead of focusing directly on the Microsoft bottom line. We hope that Microsoft can prioritize long term analysis and support more inspiring work by this trailblazing researcher.

Cartoon of boyd by Marc Scheff