The biggest mistakes you can do on Facebook pages

The biggest mistakes you can do on Facebook pages image

Check the common mistakes which you should avoid doing on your Facebook Page

These are great recommendations for companies that have a Facebook page. I would say there are suggestions that everyone should follow for their social networks. It was originally posted on SocialBakers.com

Today, we are going to analyze a touchy topic – mistakes that companies most often do on their Facebook Pages, and go into the details of them. This list of most common mistakes should give you a better idea of how to post on your Facebook Page. They are not ordered by importance.

1. Post too many times a day on Facebook

This could be also represented as spamming their Facebook fans which shouldn’t be done by any means.

Posting too many times a day should be different for brands and media companies.
The recommended average of posting would be once a day for a brand (or 2 – 3 times exceptionally if you have a very good announcement).

For media companies, the threshold that fans can endure is much bigger, typically in the range of 6 – 12 posts per day. Continue reading

Why Don’t Usability Problems Get Fixed?

There are various reasons why usability problems exist in the first place—some simple and some complex. Identifying problems and recommending solutions is not always enough. Unfortunately, the same factors that cause problems in the first place also hinder their getting fixed. The following are some of the most common reasons why usability problems don’t get fixed.

  • Lack of Resources

o   No One Has the Skills to Fix Them
o   There Is a Lack of Time, Money, or Resources

  • Technical Limitations

o   Technical Limitations Make Changes Difficult
o   Vendor Software Is Difficult to Change Continue reading

Top 25 Oddball Interview Questions

These were posted on Glassdoor, a great site for reviewing companies when you are in the job market (as many people are these days) and preparing for interviews.

While we all know the interview process can seem like a bit of a stressful process, for some it can be downright grueling! Glassdoor culled through tens of thousands interview questions that job seekers from around the world have shared on their site over the past year and found some pretty off the wall stuff. Here’s their take on the top 25 oddball interview questions of 2010:

1. “If you were shrunk to the size of a pencil and put in a blender, how would you get out?” – view answers
Asked at Goldman Sachs. More Goldman Sachs interview questions.

2. “How many ridges [are there] around a quarter?” – view answers
Asked at Deloitte. More Deloitte interview questions.

3. “What is the philosophy of Martial Arts?” – view answers
Asked at Aflac. More Aflac interview questions.

4. “Explain [to] me what has happened in this country during the last 10 years.” – view answers
Asked at Boston Consulting. More Boston Consulting interview questions.

5. “Rate yourself on a scale of 1 to 10 how weird you are.” – view answers
Asked at Capital One. More Capital One interview questions.

6. “How many basketball[s] can you fit in this room” – view answers
Asked at Google. More Google interview questions.

7. “Out of 25 horses, pick the fastest 3 horses. In each race, only 5 horses can run at the same time. What is the minimum number of races required?” – view answers
Asked at Bloomberg LP. More Bloomberg LP interview questions.

8. “If you could be any superhero, who would it be?” –  view answers
Asked at  AT&T. More AT&T interview questions.

9. “You have a birthday cake and have exactly 3 slices to cut it into 8 equal pieces. How do you do it?” –  view answers
Asked at Blackrock. More Blackrock interview questions.

10. “Given the numbers 1 to 1000, what is the minimum numbers guesses needed to find a specific number if you are given the hint “higher” or “lower” for each guess you make.” – view answers
Asked at Facebook. More Facebook interview questions.

11. “If you had 5,623 participants in a tournament, how many games would need to be played to determine the winner?” – view answers
Asked at Amazon. More Amazon interview questions.

12. “An apple costs 20 cents, an orange costs 40 cents, and a grapefruit costs 60 cents, how much is a pear?” –  view answers
Asked at Epic Systems. More Epic Systems interview questions.

13. “There are three boxes, one contains only apples, one contains only oranges, and one contains both apples and oranges. The boxes have been incorrectly labeled such that no label identifies the actual contents of the box it labels. Opening just one box, and without looking in the box, you take out one piece of fruit. By looking at the fruit, how can you immediately label all of the boxes correctly?” – view answers
Asked at Apple. More Apple interview questions.

14. “How many traffic lights in Manhattan?” – view answers
Asked at Argus Information & Advisory Services. More Argus Information & Advisory Services interview questions.

15. “You are in a dark room with no light. You need matching socks for your interview and you have 19 gray socks and 25 black socks. What are the chances you will get a matching pair? “ – view answers
Asked at Eze Castle. More Eze Castle interview questions.

16. “What do wood and alcohol have in common?” –  view answers
Asked at Guardsmark. More Guardsmark interview questions.

17. “How do you weigh an elephant without using a weigh machine?” –  view answers
Asked at IBM. More IBM interview questions.

18. “You have 8 pennies, 7 weight the same, one weighs less. You also have a judges scale. Find the one that weighs less in less than 3 steps.” –  view answers
Asked at Intel. More Intel interview questions.

19. “Why do you think only a small percentage of the population makes over $150K?” – view answers
Asked at New York Life. More New York Life interview questions.

20. “You are in charge of 20 people, organize them to figure out how many bicycles were sold in your area last year.” –  view answers
Asked at Schlumberger. More Schlumberger interview questions.

21. “How many bottles of beer are drank in the city over the week.” – view answers
Asked at The Nielsen Company. More The Nielsen Company interview questions.

22. “What’s the square root of 2000?” – view answers
Asked at UBS. More UBS interview questions.

23. “A train leaves San Antonio for Huston at 60mph. Another train leaves Huston for San Antonio at 80mph. Huston and San Antonio are 300 miles apart. If a bird leaves San Antonio at 100mph, and turns around and flies back once it reaches the Huston train, and continues to fly between the two, how far will it have flown when they collide.”- view answers
Asked at USAA. More USAA interview questions.

24. “How are M&M’s made?” – view answers
Asked at US Bank. More US Bank interview questions.

25. “What would you do if you just inherit a pizzeria from your uncle?” –  view answers
Asked at Volkswagen. More Volkswagen interview questions.

Got a good response to any of these questions? Make sure to leave your attempt at the answers through the above links.

These are just a handful of the 80,000+ interview questions Glassdoor has collected from job interview candidates through their Interview Reviews. In addition to interview questions for specific job openings at specific companies, Glassdoor collects full reviews on the interview process (phone, in-person, panel, etc.) as well as overall difficulty and whether the experience was generally positive, negative or neutral.  Their goal is to help job candidates get as prepared as possible for the job interview and it seems to be working – more than half of job candidates who complete an interview review report they got a job offer.

I used their site while recently interviewing and found it to be extremely useful. The internal (anonymous) reviews by current and past employees can really give you a sense of the culture of places you are considering working at.

Business Travel is Obsolete

While traveling in general can be a mixed bag. You know, with the trials and tribulations that come with arranging transportation, sleeping in ANY bed not your own, etc.  Traveling when required for work is obsolete in all but the most specialized of cases.

I think the biggest difference is that it is not really an option to bring along my family and after spending a whole weekend with my 1 year old, I really feel this is a downfall of business travel. Who wants to have an experience that only you can experience? I did the “after college backpacking” thing…I’m over it, really. Besides, the sterile hotels we tend to stay in are a far cry from the shared youth hostels of my youth which provided enough material for at least a year’s worth of blog posts (not to be included here).

Another point is that there is always the “acceptable expenses” hanging over your head. I mean, who decides how much I’ll eat at breakfast vs lunch or dinner? Why is a glass of wine not acceptable as a beverage? Have you ever been to Europe?

Long hours- I think there just really isn’t a justification for travel anymore; Especially with my industry. I am more than equipped to provide my clients with remote research…In every instance other than what I am doing this week…which is  focus groups. It is really hard to run a focus group from a remote location. That being said, I can do nearly every other type of research without setting foot in the same city with the users. This makes traveling for work a vestige of a bygone era.

What about the horrible affect on the environment with the cars, trains, planes and paper created of our traveling? I thought the internet was supposed to help us decrease my carbon footprint. It doesn’t change my culpability just because “my boss asked me to go.” Lets try to leave something for the next generation, shall we?

Cisco has created the Telepresence Rooms. I’ve used them. Amazing. With these, truly, it is like being there. Really no need to travel. Until they invent the transporters of Star Trek, I vote that I stay in my home town until the family is in need of a tropical vacation.

Thoughts from fellow travelers?

Website Improvements

I have made a few improvements to the site including:

  • Replacing the Home page with the latest blog post summaries – I figured it would be more interesting than having visitors see the same ‘About Us‘ message every time they came to the front page. I mean, its really exciting to read about my company’s philosophy on usability…But I realize that reading it every time you come to the site can get old. You’re welcome.
  • Reformatted the site for mobile visitors – The site now detects if visitors are using mobile browsers/devices and reformats the pages optimized for each type of device. I heard from many visitors that they were having trouble and I realize I upload lots of images and media and it can be hard on those with limited data plans. I hope the change increases my mobile visitor percentages.
  • I have approved quite a few more comments – Hey, lets have a conversation!
  • I am inserting Tweet buttons on some posts – Visitors can tweet certain posts easier (try it, let me know what you think)
  • I added customer reviews and recommendations – I wanted to let others know that my services are appreciated by all those I work with.