10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites

The design of mobile sites is the new wave of IxD. It seems everyone has an article these days about it. UX Matters is no different and posted this up today.

10 Ways Mobile Sites Are Different from Desktop Web Sites :: UXmatters.

Design and Usability Conferences 2011

I am hoping to make it to at least a few of these conferences this year.

SXSW South by Southwest Interactive

March 11-15, 2011, Austin, TX

Conference $675 ($1150 for all access)

Flight about $325

Hotel going fast! About 160 per night ($800)

Plus food stipend

http://sxsw.com/interactive

Computer Human Interaction 2011

May 7-12, 2011, Vancouver, BC

conference cost $760 ($1360 late and for non-members)

flight about $600,

hotel 239 CAD per night ($1440)

plus food stipend

http://chi2011.org/index.html

UPA 2011 , Usability Professionals Association

June 21- 24, 2011, Atlanta Georgia

conference cost $695 ($895 for non-members)

flight about $500,

hotel 173 per night ($692)

plus food stipend

https://www.usabilityprofessionals.org/conference/2011/index.html

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The Most Valuable UX Person in the World

At this year’s IA Summit in Denver, Jared Spool is giving a presentation on measuring the value a UX person delivers, which he’s called, The Most Valuable UX Person In The World. Borrowing liberally from the Dos Equis ads, he used this as the program description:

The Most Valuable UX Person In The World

She builds her wireframes with real wire from ancient hand-smelted Ukranian steel.
Her worst personas could kick the ass of your best personas.
His pattern library is now in the Library of Congress.
When she explains good design visuals, the only thing Edward Tufte can add is “What she said.”
He’s organized his wine cellar in order of awesome.
Wikileaks is ready to release her sketchbooks just because they’re cool.
He only sketches on the front of the napkin.
He built the world’s biggest web site, using only his left hand.
Last season’s American Idol featured her concept maps.
His research finds customers desire to research his behavior.
He is the only person Don Norman agrees with.
She makes her own icons out of straw.
Software bugs specifically ask for her to fix them.
He defined the damn thing, then moved on.
Her study participants screen themselves. Out.
Her interactions are the basis for everyone else’s designs.
Scalpers sell tickets to his project kickoff meetings.
He is already coding in HTML6. And has been for a decade.

They are the most valuable UX person in the world.
“Design well, my friend.”

What would you add to this list? Leave your own ideas of the Most Valuable UX Person In The World in the comments on UIE. He’ll be sprinkling your best suggestions through out his presentation, giving you full credit.

Why Don’t Usability Problems Get Fixed?

There are various reasons why usability problems exist in the first place—some simple and some complex. Identifying problems and recommending solutions is not always enough. Unfortunately, the same factors that cause problems in the first place also hinder their getting fixed. The following are some of the most common reasons why usability problems don’t get fixed.

  • Lack of Resources

o   No One Has the Skills to Fix Them
o   There Is a Lack of Time, Money, or Resources

  • Technical Limitations

o   Technical Limitations Make Changes Difficult
o   Vendor Software Is Difficult to Change Continue reading