Beer & Wine Application UX Project

World Usability Day 2015 has come and gone. I really enjoyed introducing craft beer and wine to my colleagues.

The world of craft beer and wine has just gotten more mainstream. That means there are lots of people who are trying to learn about and try these wonderful concoctions.

I just wonder how good the apps are at helping people find and track their imbibing. There are quite a few options and considering my inquisitive nature, I thought I would put together a basic competitive analysis of some beer and wine applications.

It isn’t exactly comparing apples to apples since some of these apps serve different purposes but I still hope to see some kind of differentiation and information for each.

I will be updating here as the survey continues and I invite people to let me know if you have additional applications that should be added or other feedback.

June 29 Update:

After several months of feedback on these applications, we are now going to be changing the study to reflect what people have been saying as well as include new applications on the market.

This article references a study done by Xenopsi about Craft Beer purchases and mobile usage that is related to this work.

Try one

Try one of the applications

Wallpaper Beer UX slides.002

Now rate the app

Here are the Individual QR codes and links in case its easier:

Brewery Passport

http://intel.ly/brew

qrcode (Brewery Passport)

Brewery Passport

Next Glass

http://intel.ly/next

qrcode (Next Glass)

Next Glass

Picky Pint

http://intel.ly/picky

qrcode (Picky Pint)

Picky Pint

Untappd

http://intel.ly/tap

qrcode (Untappd)

Untappd

Vivino

http://intel.ly/vino

qrcode (Vivino)

Vivino

Winery Passport

http://intel.ly/wine

qrcode (Winery Passport)

Winery Passport

Ice Cream Sandwich Means One Less Android OS Fork

Now that the new android OS, Ice Cream Sandwich, has arrived, many people (especially developers) are breathing a sigh of relief. There are many different devices and carriers out there and each have their own devices. Each hardware company has their own bloatware *ahem* I mean, dynamic interface, laid on top of the OS.

Take all that and the fact that when the tablets were introduced, they all got Honeycomb; a fairly different operating system and interface from Gingerbread on the smart phones and it made transitioning between the two somewhat difficult as the interface paradigms were different enough to baffle some users.

The hope is that with the re-merging of the fork between these OSs where both handsets and tablets are run with the same program, there will be an improved android ecosystem.

It sounds great, but the problem is that there are still too many fragmented projects with android. Open source is great for innovative development and free market ideas, but it is difficult for programmers, let alone us lowly end users, to understand what is happening and which one would really be a better solution for our needs.

Ice Cream Sandwich is a step in the right direction. Now there needs to be additional progress towards a more unified release cycle across all devices, carriers and OS upgrades. While you are at it, lets remove things like blur or other carrier and hardware UI skins. They just get in the way and generally provide very little value to most users. Make them applications that people can download if they choose.

Please leave your thoughts below about android development and what it means for end users.

Motorola Android Razr

My favorite cell phone was for many years, the Razor (& the Krazr)

All the best rumors about the release today say that Motorola and Google have teamed up to release something similar with the Android operating system on it.
Check out the teaser video:

Will it have Ice Cream Sandwich? I can’t wait to find out.

Engadget will be blogging the press conference today in real time on THIS SITE. Check it out!

For the Hands On Up close pictures, check out the slideshow.