Top 10 Child Friendly YouTube Extras

Here are some great ways to to filter YouTube to make it safer for educational and child friendly viewing as well as some ways to edit YouTube videos.


Top 5 Ways to Make YouTube Viewing Safer for Kids

  1. YouTube: Safety Mode – This is a great new feature which is simple to use. By clicking on the safety mode button at the bottom left of a YouTube screen, it filters inappropriate words from comments and doesn’t allow inappropriate videos to be played.
  2. ViewPure – Nice way to remove comments and ads from YouTube video and easy to use. Also, can install a bookmarklet into your browser for convenience.
  3. Safe Share TV – Great site which generates a unique safe URL for viewing YouTube content.
  4. Silentube – Installs a bookmarklet in your browser to watch all YouTube, Viddler, and Vimeo videos in peace.
  5. Vusafe – An excellent way for an educator to create a safe environment for students to watch videos. Continue reading

Stop H-Commerce Hacker Documentaries

When I first started at McAfee, I was introduced to Stop H-Commerce and saw this video:

The concept of the site is to present how hacking has changed over the years, what criminals are doing and how they do it. It provides recommendations and ways for people, families and companies to protect themselves as well as help to identify and bring to justice those who are out to commit technological crime. Continue reading

How TED Connects the Idea-Hungry Elite

I have published multiple videos and discussions spawned by the TED conference that happens every year in Long Beach, CA

I find the talks inspiring and the fact that the videos are available to the general public and spawn additional ideas and responses is what makes TED so influential.

An article from FastCompany Online makes mention of several of the best features of TED.

Additionally, they point out some of their favorite videos. I must say that Patti Maes and Pranav Mistry’s Sixth Sense talks still; capture my imagination of the future of personal computing. Barry Schwartz’s Paradox of Choice is also very compelling.

1) Jill Bolte Taylor
My Stroke of Insight

2008
When the neuroscientist picks up a human brain with a spinal cord attached, the audience gasps. When she’s done talking about her stroke, they’re crying.
6) Dan Pink
Surprising Science of Motivation

2009
The science proves that intrinsic motivation works better than extrinsic rewards, but your boss doesn’t understand. Pink explains how to tell her.
2) Patti Maes and Pranav Mistry
Sixth Sense Demo

2009
The MIT Media Lab researchers debut a spooky Minority Report — style wearable interface.
7) Hans Rosling
The Best Stats You’ve Ever Seen

2006
The Swedish professor dances through a spectacular animation of world development.
3) Ken Robinson
Schools Kill Creativity

2006
This highly influential talk spawned a viral 2010 follow-up and made the creativity expert a star; Robinson says he now “gets stopped in airports.”
8) Benjamin Zander
On Music and Passion

2008
TED hosts performances as well as talks. This blends the two, with Zander at the grand piano.
4) Tony Robbins
Why We Do What We Do

2006
Robbins high-fives Al Gore in this video. “One of the best TED moments of all time,” says TED video chief June Cohen.
9) Barry Schwartz
The Paradox of Choice

2006
In a baggy T-shirt, with glasses sliding down his nose, Schwartz gives a profound, witty discourse on why more freedom doesn’t equal more happiness.
5) Elizabeth Gilbert
Nurturing Creativity

2009
The best-selling author bares her struggle to repeat the success of Eat, Pray, Love.
10) V.S. Ramachandran
On Your Mind

2007
A brain scientist in a leather jacket tell us how “this 3-pound mass of jelly … can contemplate the meaning of infinity.”

I would also recommend taking a look at several of the best performance videos on TED. (click on TED and select talks re-sized to ‘beautiful’ and related to ‘entertainment’)